Pinterest’s Copyright Problem: Part II

We recently discussed how Pinterest might enable copyright infringement, and how to ensure your business is protected from liability. Before getting a Pinterest page, however, you should also read the site’s Terms of Use.

Read this passage twice:

‘By making available any Member Content through the Site, Application or Services, you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit such Member Content only on, through or by means of the Site, Application or Services.’

What’s it mean?

Every image you upload to Pinterest becomes their property. They can sell, alter or display it however they like. You forfeit your rights to the image at the moment you upload it, and you can’t get them back.

We’re not lawyers, and these terms haven’t faced a legal test yet. But we think they will. Pinterest’s policy is a sharp contrast to how you expect your ILS and social media partners to treat your images.

Pinterest may never sell or re-use your property, but for now, they can. Since many images aren’t uploaded by their owners, there may be consequences to this. Before joining Pinterest, businesses should consider the possible ramifications.

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  2. [...] recently told you about a clause in Pinterest's Terms of Use that allowed the service to sell your content. Last week Pinterest announced that the clause has [...]

  3. [...] recently told you about a clause in Pinterest's Terms of Use that allowed the service to sell your content. Last week Pinterest announced that the clause has [...]

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